Tag Archives: Workshops

Georgia Quilt Council’s Fall Convention

Quilts on the Square

Last weekend I attended the fall convention of the Georgia Quilt Council in Carrollton, GA.  After all the years I’ve been quilting, this was my first time attending the council’s meeting, and I was impressed.  These ladies know quilting and know Georgia.  I met many wonderful quilters, appraisers, shop owners, historians, guild officers, and teachers.  It was a “who’s who” of quilters in Georgia.  I was so busy in my booth I didn’t take photos of the speakers, but here’s peek at one of the quilts displayed at the convention:

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Carrollton welcomed us with quilts hung in the shop windows on the town square:

Carrollton GQC Quilts

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Quilts Hung in Bookstore

Next was a tour of the facility that will house the new Southeast Quilt and Textile Museum:

Southeast Quilt and Textile Museum facility

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The above photo is of an interior wall of the facility, which used to house cotton bales for GoldKist.  The building was badly burned in a fire in the early 1900’s, and you can still see the outline of the hay bales on the walls.

I had a lovely time at the fall convention, and here’s a quick bulletin of events coming up and an invitation to join me.  If you can’t, hop on over to my Color Mastery blog and enjoy the resources there until you can attend one my lectures or workshops:

Oct. 13, Creative Quilter’s Guide to Color, Cotton Patch Quilters, Athens, GA

Oct. 17, Machine Quilting Mastery, Sew Memorable, Dawsonville, GA

Nov. 7, Color Mastery for Any Quilter, Quilt Shop on the Square, Ellijay, GA

Nov. 23, Simple Color, Stunning Quilts, Scrappy Quilt Guild, Calhoun, GA

Hope to see you soon in one of my workshops – let’s make a colorful quilt together!

A Real Book’s Lasting Value

Color Mastery Fan

I want my work to last.  Longevity is one of the three main goals I have for my books.  The other two?  A post for another day.

I realized long ago that it took just as long to write a book that was trendy and out of print after two years as it did to write a classic.  And as a quilter and artist, I appreciate books that provide me with lessons for years to come.

Bookshelf

I often hear people complain about how expensive books are, which is why I go for those that provide me with lasting value.  I enjoy patterns, booklets, and other fun diversions.  But they don’t have the lasting value of a book.

Bookshelf 2

Color Mastery has nine quilt projects.  If you bought them individually in a pattern, each would average $15.00.  Multiply that times nine and you get $135.00.

Color Mastery also has 11 exercises, and has twelve months worth of class material.  I teach shop owners how they can offer a different class each month using the exercises and projects in the book.  A full-day class averages about $60.00, and 12 of them would be $720.00.

$135.00 worth of patterns/projects, and $720.00 worth of classes is a total of $855.00.  Still think a book is expensive?  Look’s like the world’s best bargain to me.

The real test of a book-lover’s book is this:  does it provide those things that make a reader’s life easier, that will make the book last, and makes it easy to find, or get more information?  I printed Color Mastery on museum-quality paper using the best photographer and printer in the industry.

I included an index to make information easy to find.  Look at the latest quilt book you bought:  I bet it doesn’t have one.  Publishers are skimping on this kind of stuff and betting you won’t notice.  Bibliographies too.  I want to know how to find out more information when I’m interested in a topic, and I know my readers do too.  And librarians love them.

Does the book’s binding last?  Is it sewn or glued?  Color Mastery’s is sewn, of course.  And it has a spine, so you can find it on a store shelf or your own.

Look for these qualities when you buy a book.  Be a discerning consumer.  Expect them in your books and ask for them.  And support quilt book authors who give you the best.

Color Mastery Workshop at Stitching Barn

Color Mastery Workshop at the Stitching Barn

I spent a gorgeous weekend in Eatonton, GA, near Lake Oconee at a delightful new shop called the Stitching Barn.  Becky Pittman held her grand opening last week and invited me to present a Color Mastery workshop on Saturday.

The shop really was an old dairy barn and is absolutely charming, both inside and out.  Here are photos of the front, with a lovely porch and old equipment.

Stitching Barn Front

Stitching Barn Front - alternate

Becky has not only lovely fabric, but knitting and smocking supplies as well.  I met her knitting and smocking teachers, both experts and so willing to share with their students.  Becky runs the shop with her daughters, so quilting is a family affair for the Pittmans.

Great retreat potential at the Stitching Barn.  Gather your quilting buddies, rent a lake house, and take a workshop from Becky.  Sounds like a delightful plan to me.  Let’s go!

Over at my Color Mastery blog, I’ve posted photos of the exercises we do in class and some interesting results we had from them.  Don’t miss it!

The Aha Moment for Fiber Artists

Multimedia message, originally uploaded by Colorful Quilter.

My favorite insights as an instructor are when I see the actual moments my students really get it:  that singular moment when they realize they’ll never see color, fiber art, or quilting quite the same way.

We had lots of those moments in my Color for Fiber Artists workshop at the Sharptop Arts Center in Jasper.  This was a two-day class, and the first day is learning the vocabulary of color.  It can be a bit befuddling, as there are lots of terms to understand.  But the second day is when the light bulbs go off and I hear things like:

“I realized I was making the same quilts over and over again, using the same colors.”

“I’m so glad I took this class.  I never would have imagined putting those colors together.”

Multimedia message, originally uploaded by Colorful Quilter.

We created one of these fiber art pieces for each color harmony, starting with the same main color.  When you finish, you have a sampling of what’s possible around the color wheel using the same color as the starting point.  It was an exercise that really opened the eyes of the fantastic ladies taking the class.

Multimedia message, originally uploaded by Colorful Quilter.

Multimedia message, originally uploaded by Colorful Quilter.

These are my birds, and I started with the same red-violet fabric each time.  Because it’s a tertiary color, it’s difficult for most people to identify, and it’s complement is yellow-green, also a challenging color because it’s so bright.  I pulled off the contrast well, but they are all too cool.  Too much green, and not enough reds and oranges for me.  The challenge is to use fabrics in your stash, and I brought my scraps with me and let students use those as well as their own.  I will probably tweak these later.

I took these photos on my camera phone and uploaded them via Flickr, all from my cell phone.  Technology makes my life and my work so much more fun!